Nourishing gifted souls

Nourishing gifted souls

Bon Abattoir nurtures, supports, and promotes artistic talent.

It works in partnership with artists to raise their profile, value and collectability. Bon Abattoir produces independent exhibitions. It collaborates with gallerists, specialists and institutions to develop the best platform for each artist’s work and career.

From 2007-2012 Bon Abattoir worked with Charming Baker. Bon Abattoir continues its work with other gifted souls


ARTISTS


Abigail Ozora Simpson

The It Girl of Ceramics

The Observer

Exhibited and collected internationally, Abigail Ozora Simpson is out to tweak a few noses. “I want to change people’s perception about clay,” she says. “I find that exciting because it means there’s room for rebellion.” Abigail is the daughter of celebrated painter, Michael Simpson. Her coyly vulnerable, yet lusciously risque, hand-coiled sculptures pull focus between scale and detail. Touchy feely surfaces sit invitingly upon soft feminine curves. The erotic meets the maternal with everything in between.


The Douglas Brothers

The most desirable photographers of their generation

Creative Review

The Douglas Brothers are photographic pioneers. Their prolific collaboration produced some of the most distinctive, influential and imitated photographic styles to emerge in decades. Their work – portraiture, collage, reportage, nude and abstract imagery – straddled the art/commerce divide and sat as comfortably in transatlantic publications as it did in international art galleries. While the question of who actually pressed the shutter release was never answered, the impact of their images remains timeless.


Richard Trupp

Highly rated

The Observer Magazine

Sculptor Richard Trupp is a protégée of the late Sir Anthony Caro. He works in steel, bronze, rubber and park benches. Described by Caro as “ambitious”, Birmingham-born Trupp transforms the miniature and mundane into the monumental and significant. Trupp’s signature wedge sculptures are both a nod to his mentor’s industrial leanings and a very distinct and emblematic direction of his own. Remember the name.


Tom Swift

Happiness is a warm painting

Tom Swift

Happiness to Tom Swift is a warm painting. For an artist he is an anomaly. Raised in Margate, under a William Turner sky, Swift views the world from a less topological, less tortured perspective. “I am caveman-like in my simplicity, “ he admits. “I am driven, not by artistic torment, but by the spirit of generosity. I aim to create work that is joyous, uncomplicated and instinctive. I like looking at the world in that way.”